Archives For Ethics

Well, I have to say… it’s been a rough week.

Mistakes happen.  I am a firm believer that one key to strong leadership is the willingness to be accountable and take responsibility for those mistakes. Good leaders do this even if they contribute to only a small percentage of the situation. They do this even if the blame lies beyond their control. Why? Because the buck has to stop somewhere… and it should be with the leader.

So when mistakes happen, what should you do as a responsible leader?

The answer: Apologize and try to make amends. Whether the mistake affects your internal, external or potential customers, you must take action quickly to make things right.

Value Selling

Well, I’ve had to pull a page from my own playbook this week.  We, at Luminosity Global and The Global LABB, have had a series of unfortunate events that caused our clients to be frustrated and inconvenienced.  In response to these “events”, I would like to offer the following:

This week, I am going to ask you to really think about Courage – it is an important concept that seems to be falling by the wayside. Aristotle referred to courage as the first virtue because it makes all of the other virtues possible. Aside being the most important human virtue, it is also the most important business virtue.

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Think about it…

  • Leadership requires making bold and often unpopular decisions…
  • Innovation requires conceiving radical, unconventional ideas…
  • Sales requires being repeatedly rejected and still going back to attempt to close the deal…

Leadership, Innovation and Sales all require Courage. Without courage all of our core business concepts (including leadership, innovation and sales) suddenly lose their potency… withering in obscurity. So why do we put so little emphasis and value on courage in the workplace? Continue Reading…

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Imagine this…

You are a senior level Finance executive in a large, very prominent nonprofit organization in South Florida.  You are responsible for managing the funds provided by the federal government designed to help put Americans back to work – the so-called Stimulus. Many meetings are held to ensure that everyone understands what the money is to be used for – and what it is not to be used for…

Several weeks have passed when you receive a request from a large department to purchase an extremely expensive product from the manufacturer in Canada… with Stimulus funds. You refuse the request based on the fact that the Stimulus money is specifically earmarked to help put Americans back to work – and this clearly does not meet the designated guidelines!

Within hours you are contacted by your superior and told to approve purchase and apply the Stimulus funds … despite the fact that no new jobs would be created for the company or for the US in general.

What would you do?

Continue Reading…

Imagine this…

You are interviewing for a high level position with a major company. Everything is going well, and the person you would be working for requests to meet with you to discuss “details”. When the meeting begins, your potential boss, John, verbally offers you the position and the title you were hoping for. He also offers you a salary that is below market value, however he promises it will be adjusted as soon as you come on board. He explains that for “HR” reasons he must stay within a certain range, but he understands your skills and knowledge are exceptional and, again, commits to bringing you to fair market value once you are “on board”. As part of the negotiations, you request a sign-on bonus, but your potential boss clearly states that sign-on bonuses are against company policy. You leave the meeting with the title, level, and salary components of the offer nailed down, but it appears that the sign-on bonus is non-negotiable.

Continue Reading…

Imagine this:

You are a top administrator, in fact the Chief Operations Officer, for a highly reputable Center at a major university. This particular university happens to be the largest employer in the region. You are highly respected and everyone appreciates the work you do. One day your manager, the Center Director, comes to you and asks you to transfer $250,000 from a donor dependent, highly recognizable Institute at the University… into his personal business account that has nothing to do with  the cause the donors support – in fact, your manager’s other company develops a product that has nothing to do with curing the disease the Institute is responsible for. Your manager demands that this questionable transfer must happen before the end of the fiscal year – in two weeks! After collecting more information, the request is to effectively steal these funds from the donors of the Institute in order to fund a commercial business that both the head of the Institute and the head of the Center are highly vested in on the side….

What would you do?

Continue Reading…