Archives For Organizational Politics

As those who have been reading this blog for a while know, my passion is global business. I love to travel and interact with different people from different places.  Everywhere I go (and I have lived, worked or traveled to over 70 countries), I truly enjoy observing distinct cultures and taking away lessons learned from each place and every culture I engage with.  In

Vienna

fact, a good deal of my life’s work is based on this very concept.

This summer, while attending Board Meetings in Vienna, I had the privilege of engaging with several colleagues – global executives and academic experts – to discuss some rather interesting views relating to the differences in business perspectives between Eastern Europe and the rest of the world.  It became interesting as the various views on doing business in different regions shifted… but today, Vienna:

Vienna is a beautiful city filled with exquisite buildings, powerful opera halls, sophisticated clothing and incredible art. The Viennese people themselves, without a doubt, embody “Culture” with a Capital C. From high art to street art, from music to theater, dance to interpretive movement, architecture to fashion – it’s all there…and it’s simply a way of life.

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At The Root Of It All

October 29, 2013 — 2 Comments

Here is an under-recognized, under-utilized truth:

PEOPLE make the company, the company does not make the people. 

Often leaders are preoccupied with who they are going to hire.  Agreed – hiring is a critically important decision.  Who you hire, as a leader, will ultimately determine your level of success… or will it?  It seems logical enough. After all, if you hire great people you’re laying the foundation for building great teams, units, and organizations… as well as great overall business results, right?

At The Root Of It All

On the surface, you are absolutely right. However, if you dig down deep to the root of many organizational issues, you find a much darker problem: “A” Players are hired for their talent, innovation and potential to take the organization to new heights, and then they are treated no different than the “B” and “C” Players in the organization that make no real day to day impact. The reality is that without great people that make real impact, you cannot sustainably build great products or provide great services. Continue Reading…

Some confrontation at work is expected (even healthy), however if there are individuals in your organization with Chronic Confrontationitis, it’s up to you, as a leader, to protect your organization. Afflicted individuals have the nasty habit of separating people from information, social situations, peers, tools to do their job, affection and admiration… as well as hard earned acknowledgement and praise.  They actively create a culture where people feel “less than”, causing both emotional and physical stress.

Without the acquisition of effective strategies to combat Chronic Confrontationitis, competent team members may end up with damaged careers or become so uncomfortable with the conflict in the environment that they opt out all together.  If you, or individuals within your organization, are impacted by someone with Chronic Confrontationitis, there are several things you may want to consider:

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An individual with Chronic Confrontationitis is persistent in his attempts to force others to comply with his will. His methods are subtle – disguised with all the right behaviors. People respect and trust him, and he quietly betrays their trust whenever necessary to fuel his addiction. He must always be right, using confrontation to prove his point because, to him, the end always justifies the means.  And if he is particularly good at this, no one except his targets notice the betrayals. In some lethal workplaces, he may survive for years, or even become a high-level executive.

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To make matters worse, our chronic confrontationitis victim usually has the dedication, focus and business acumen to create success, or at least the appearance of success. He is held up as an example of a company-centric leader, despite his underhanded tactics and inability to lead. He is rewarded, while the frustration builds among the targets of his bullying, intimidating, backstabbing and manipulating behavior. Continue Reading…

Last week we discussed the basics of organizational politics – this week we’ll talk about some intentional strategies that you can leverage to facilitate your success. Whether your perception of organizational politics is positive or negative (I don’t know many who are neutral), you need to have the tools available to expedite your career growth, as well as to enable corporate growth and development.

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It is important for you to take both a strategic and an intentional approach to politics. Unfortunately, there are few useful resources available to assist you in navigating your way through the turbulent sea of corporate politics. Below are some strategies that I have employed myself for many years, as well as consistently deploying them with my clients: Continue Reading…

The ability to engage successfully in organizational politics is an essential component to your success in today’s global business environment.  We see it everywhere: from the Administrative Assistant’s ability to act as the gate-keeper to the bosses calendar, all the way up the organizational chart… to the CEO lobbying the Board to support his/her pet projects. At every level within every company, how you communicate equates to how well you are politically perceived.

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To become a polished politician, learn to communicate intentionally. In order to focus attention on your ideas and proposals, develop a persuasive style, and always back your position with solid facts and examples. Good leaders adjust their messaging for different audiences, but do not align themselves too strongly with any one group. Continue Reading…